1/3‘’At sixteen, I was working with my dad in our wood workshop when I got into an accident and I lost my arm. I come from a very poor family so I never had a proper education. I never learned how to read or write. When I lost my arm, I had no diploma to fall back on. During the war there was a great demand for newspapers so I became a newspaper boy. Every day I would finish my shift at 4PM and then I would study the paper of that day. I wanted to be able to read about the things everybody was talking about. I would study word for word. That way, I taught myself how to read and write.“
(Beirut, Lebanon)

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