1/2 ”My father had heard that men and women got separated at the UN base. All the male family members tried to escape through the woods. Still, my father didn’t want to leave my mother alone. My mother was pregnant at the time, and I was only three years old. Together, we arrived at the UN base in Potočari. My mother tried to convince my father to dress up like a woman so they wouldn’t capture him. He refused to do that. When the buses, for evacuating women and children, arrived they wouldn’t let my father get on. He was hoping that the soldiers would show him some compassion as he was carrying me. But they told him to go and stand with the other men, and to give me to anyone else or they would kill me. He gave me to my mom, who was standing nearby, and told her to take good care of us and that they would see each other soon.”

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(1/4) ''Because of my father's medical condition, we decided to try to go from Srebrenica to the city of Tuzla. My father and I managed to get on a truck. Unfortunately, my mother and sister could not get on a truck and had to stay in Srebrenica. However, my father’s...

I wanted to create this series because I believe that what happened 25 years ago in Srebrenica is part of Dutch history. Yet, before coming to Bosnia, I knew very little about what had happened. To be able to hear these stories, first hands from survivors was painful...

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