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2/2 “During my depression, I lost all my friends except for one friend. Her name is Kultum. Somehow she always stayed by my side. Even though I felt that I could not trust anyone, she never gave up on me.  Looking back, there are a few things that saved my life. The first thing was having someone to talk to and the second thing is Michael Jackson. His music, his lyrics gave me so much power and strength. I still struggle to speak about my emotions but I have a strong urge to do so. Even this conversation was really hard to have.”

(Tunis, Tunisia)

½ “I was never taught to share my feelings. I am an only child so whenever I would go through something I would try to talk to my parents about it. However, I never felt taken seriously by them. At the age of fifteen I got into a serious depression. For almost four years I would not leave my room. In the beginning of my depression my mother took me to see a psychologist. We had a one-hour conversation and when I was done my mum came to pick me up. It felt really good to talk to someone. The psychologist said to my mother that from now on it was important that she would speak to me about feelings and emotions. My mother interpreted it as criticism and an invasion of our family’s privacy. She never took me back to see the psychologist..’‘

(Tunis, Tunisia)

“I was seven when I started writing in my diary. It was in the middle of the civil war and the basement of our building which was a clothing factory became our shelter. From my little window I could see the snipers aim and bombs falling on Beirut. I was so affected by the war that I would write down everything I saw and felt. My diary had a beautiful green cover and it became my best friend, my all time confidant. Every time I finished writing I would hide it as a treasure so no one could find it. At some point our neighborhood became a hotspot. Bombs were flying around so we had to flee. I was afraid of losing my diary so I hid it very carefully in the shelter where I was sleeping. One year later, when we returned, the building had been rebuild after all the damage of the war. The first thing I did was look for my diary but it was nowhere to be found. For many years I searched until at some point I came to realize that I would never find it again. I couldn’t write for a long time. I felt that I had lost my story. Sometimes, I still stand in front of that same building and I feel like that 7-year-old-girl again who wants to go into the shelter to try to find her diary, to find her story.”
(Beirut, Lebanon)

Hey Everyone! As some of you might know my book came out this month and is available on Amazon Germany. Once you translate the website to English it is super easy to order the book for only €22.32. The book is a collection of work from the last 4 years and for those who have been following me from the beginning I made sure to put in new stories as well. It contains 320 pages with more than 450 stories. If you have any problems ordering the book just comment below and I will try to help you. By ordering this book are not only getting yourself a present but you are making a huge contribution to this project 🙂 Kind regards,
Debra Barraud

https://www.amazon.de/Humans-Amsterdam-Selese-Roch/dp/9059567129/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1480620925&sr=8-1&keywords=humans+of+amsterdam

“After I came back from my travel to south East Asia I felt that I wanted to help others. I figured the best way I could do that was by going to University and do a Bachelor’s programme in Pedagogical Sciences. I really wanted to be able to understand other people’s problems. I could see myself working with troubled teens or addicts. In the programme we had a drama class and the idea was to learn how to put yourself in someone else’s shoes. For the first assignment I had to pretend I was a piece of fireworks. Later on the assignments got more complex. Together with my classmate we had to build a human Spaghetti Bridge. I just couldn’t figure out what the connection was between me wanting to help others and being a string of spaghetti. So I quit.”